Research Matters

Research Matters

Studying Resiliency


Yo Jackson is the principal investigator on a new $1.7 million dollar grant from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institutes of Mental Health. She'll investigate how abused children develop resiliency.

Aired September 20, 2009


2 minutes 3.7 MB) | Download mp3

Transcript

A researcher hopes to improve treatment for children exposed to trauma and abuse. From the University of Kansas, this is Research Matters. I'm Brendan Lynch.

Yo Jackson, associate professor of applied behavioral science and clinical child psychology, became interested in children's resiliency during her clinical work as a psychologist.

Jackson: "I was finding that so many of the kids that I saw in clinical work had symptoms that required treatment, but often had histories that spoke to significant events that had happened to them that were the sort of out-of-the-ordinary experiences. And I became fascinated with that process. I also spent a lot of time in graduate school studying things like aggression and kids who had problems following the rules and kids who had conduct problem. And I was interested not only in the mechanisms or risk factors that created those situations but also what were the mechanisms that reversed those situations."

Jackson is the principal investigator on a new $1.7 million dollar grant from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institutes of Mental Health. She'll investigate how abused children cope with their experiences.

Jackson: "Our particular focus in this project is child maltreatment. That broadly defined includes all of the different types of experiences related to what most people call child abuse. So, physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, psychological abuse. But it is important to note that children who are exposed to maltreatment and even the subgroup of those that are in foster care, also experience all of those other stresses that kids experience."

Jackson says the results from her project will benefit psychologists; inform administrators who design programs for children exposed to trauma; and enlighten lawmakers who direct funds to such programs.

Jackson : "We really do see this on an individual level - for therapists and for the field. But then also broader hopefully to help inform policy about where we put our limited resources in an effort to improve the lives and welfare of these children."

For more about Yo Jackson and resiliency in children, log on to Research Matters dot K-U dot E-D-U. For the University of Kansas, I'm Brendan Lynch.

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