Research Matters

Research Matters

ipad and Cortical Visual Impairment


A researcher believes the iPad could vastly improve the lives of kids living with Cortical Visual Impairment, a neurological disorder that prevents children from interpreting visual information.

Episode #106



2 minutes (3.1 MB) | Download mp3

Transcript


The iPad could offer bright hope for children with impaired visual function. From the University of Kansas, this is Research Matters. I’m Brendan Lynch. 8

Muriel Saunders, assistant research professor at KU’s Life Span Institute, believes the iPad could vastly improve the lives of kids living with Cortical Visual Impairment, a neurological disorder that prevents children from interpreting visual information.  12

Saunders: We tested 15 children, and were absolutely shocked. Every single child was enthralled with the iPad. Children that typically didn’t look at people, didn’t respond with objects, or responded in a very repetitious fashion, were absolutely glued to the iPad. It was an amazing experience.”

Saunders said that traditionally such children work with therapists and parents using a light box, like the light box a doctor uses to see an x-ray. 8

Saunders: Someone with a severe CVI will spend a lot of time looking at lights. They might just sit and look at a light inside the house, or typically they look out the window into the bright sunlight. They might look briefly at something passing by, but they don’t look at faces and they don’t look at objects. So they appear to be blind.”

Early intervention in the lives of kids with CVI could help them to gain better vision as they grow. Saunders said the iPad might advance this life-changing therapy. 9

Saunders: With the proper intervention techniques, the amazing thing is that the child’s brain grows the brain cells need in the cerebral cortex. It grows the brain cells necessary to begin understanding what their eye is seeing.

For more about the iPad and cortical visual impairment, log on to Research Matters dot KU dot edu. For the university of Kansas, I’m Brendan Lynch.

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iPad research promising for children with cortical visual impairment


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